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7) Joe and Sally took a sailboat out a clear

Question : 7) Joe and Sally took a sailboat out a clear : 2007965

7) Joe and Sally took a sailboat out on a clear and sunny day. Everything seemed normal. Until a  storm came quickly above the water. The waves pounding on the stern of the small green sailboat. This made water in their face. They started to worry about they're safety. Then it rounded the sharp curve in the bay so the wind and current now were flowing together. Joe and Sally each had a job. Joe pulled in the sail and Sally steared the boat into the dock. Amazed at how quickly they had both been in danger and safe again.

8) Peter Pan is a much-beloved childrens story. But, it usually does give an adult pause when they come to read it to there own children.  A parent  is often thinking of either the stage productions they might have seen or the Disney animated film. The novel, than, can come as a tremendous shock, especially in it's treatment of women.  Especially for feminists. It could be argued that Barrie's book was simply a reflection of English society and values at the turn of the 20th century others might see a more disturbing reflection of soceital norms or a reflection of Barrie's own love/hate relationship with his mother/woman. Certainly the text celebrated mothers and motherhood. Only Mrs. Darling remembered anything about Peter Pan what she does remember is quite disturbing, she seems to be able to understand childhood and children. Whereas Mr. Darling is only a large child, an overgrown lost boy- like Hook, looking for a mother to look after them. What prompts Peter to take Wendy; and only incidentaly her brothers to Neverland is Wendys' ability to sew his shadow back on: and her bed-time storytelling ability. She becomes the stand-in mother in Neverland, which is predominantly male. Populate by the lost boys, the red Indians, and the pirates. The only other female characters are definitely not mothers and could be said to be 'the other kind' of female, the seductress or temptress. Tinker-Bell's 'problem' with Wendy most adults would recognize as sexuel jealousy, and Tiger Lily is

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